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A Continuation of My Ruminations on the Human Factor of ALM

by Angela 2. August 2013 12:41

Part 1: In the beginning

In my “And Now For Something Completely Different” series, I wax philosophical, almost literally, on human behavior. Now I’m hearing that Bjork song in my head. Anyone else? No? Just me? Ok then, moving on.

Now, before anyone thinks I’m some kind of behavioral science genius, I had quite a few of these realizations while reading “Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates us” by Daniel Pink. Earlier this year at the ALM Summit, it seemed like every other speaker that I went to see recommended that book. And so I gave in and ordered it, hard to argue being that it was around $10 on Amazon. I also then spelunked into a deep rabbit hole of Wikipedia articles, scientific studies, and other related digital publications to see what the real experts had to say. And while nothing I read was specifically aimed at ALM, or even technology per se (except for the use of OSS to disprove money as a primary motivator), I found so many ideas that were EXTREMELY relevant to what I was doing in my day to day job. So this post will focus on the first major point of many that I dog-eared in the book.

Favorite quote #1: The best use of money as a motivator is to pay people enough to take the issue of money off the table. (and ditch the stupid contests!)

Intrinsic motivation. This is one of those things that you KNOW to be true, but you can’t quite put your finger on the why of it. I know I had that reaction whenever contests and incentives were announced at my previous job. I immediately groaned, rolled my eyes, and tried to think of the fastest way to produce the results they wanted while still doing all of the work that I saw as actually being valuable. You know, the stuff I am “graded” on during my end of year review.  Turns out, everyone felt that way too. And we never got the type of results from those silly contests that management was hoping for. It also felt like a form of punishment, as in, if you need to incentivize me with $500 do this, it must REALLY suck! Imagine our enthusiasm to take on that challenge? At the end of the day, money and rewards only get you so far, and too many bonuses and rewards can actually backfire and decrease motivation. People have to be internally motivated to WANT to do something for a strategy to realize long term success. Now I’m not a volunteer, mind you, I get paid very well at my new job, but I did leave a higher paying job to realign my career path with my passions. At the end of the day, the challenge of solving customers’ problems and making their lives better was driving my behavior. My passion is ignited and sustained by fresh, new problems and by having at least a little freedom to be creative in how I do my job. I should note that in most cases, I am speaking specifically from the perspective of a person working in IT so if you are in a vastly different line of work, you may not agree with all of my observations.

So back on track, my first thought was that this is yet another example of where agile is just a natural fit for software development. People enjoy challenge, and novelty, and need an environment that fosters that. Not that Waterfall based environments cannot provide freedom, novelty, and challenge (don’t laugh), but I have yet to find one that provided freedom, let alone the RIGHT kinds of novelty and challenge to promote a motivational environment. For instance, working 80 hour weeks for a month to make a deadline because of poorly planned milestones that you had no early visibility or input into is NOT a motivating challenge. And when the next 6 – 12 months of your life are scheduled, collated, and written in stone well, there goes freedom and creativity. Your focus now is on making dates, at any cost.

Because Agile and Scrum-based processes focus on self-direction, introspection, and continuous improvement, people get opportunities to constantly evolve and find new and more efficient ways to solve problems. Now that’s FUN. I’ve met few software engineers who don’t respond to that kind of motivation in a VERY positive way. After all, software development is as much of an art as a science. Despite all of the misleading comparisons to building a house, building software requires FAR more creativity and flexibility than framing a McMansion in the suburbs. And making software is HARD. The first time a Scrum instructor (Richard Hundhausen to be specific) uttered those words out loud, I kind of laughed, but then realized just how significant that statement was. Say it out loud with me and really think about it, “software development is HARD”. Sure there are hundreds of frameworks and software patterns out there to help you do it, but at the end of the day knowing how and when to use them, or even when to stray from them, is a really tough skill to master and requires constant recalibration.

Any artist will tell you that being confined by strict rules, and working under a heavily structured rewards and punishment system, stifles their creativity and narrows their focus. Working without freedom and with stifled creativity results in an inferior product, and an unhappy artist. It’s no different for software craftsman. At first I bristled a little at that term, “software craftsman”, but have come to embrace it as being a FAR more accurate label for what we do. Software is not churned out using repetitive and unchanging patterns like a Whopper. It relies as much on the right-brain as it does the left, and if it doesn’t for you, you might be doing it wrong.

Next we’ll talk about metrics. Hairs on the back of your next standing up? Did you get a little chill just then? I did.

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | Agile | Collaboration | Process Methodology | SDLC | development | Scrum

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DTDPS, What It Is and Why You’ll LOVE it

by Angela 19. July 2013 19:18

It sounds like an STD, I know, but I promise it’s not. and after you’ve given your customers a DTDPS, they will thank you for it Smile  So hopefully I’ve intrigued you enough to read a bit more about this mysterious program. I’ve created a short FAQ to walk you through it:

Now what exactly IS DTDPS? Well first of all it’s a Microsoft offering, so expect MANY acronyms to follow. DTDPS stands for Developer Tools Deployment Planning Services. Specifically, the development tools that these services are meant to be used in conjunction with are the Microsoft Visual Studio ALM platform - Team Foundation Server, Visual Studio, and Microsoft Test Manager (TFS, VS, and MTM for good measure). 

So what does this really do for me? While most people are already very familiar with Visual Studio from a .NET development perspective, many people who own the other tools within the TFS platform are not taking full advantage of them. DTDPS is the solution to this problem, connecting customers with the right partners to make sure they are getting the full value of their ALM investment. Software that sits on the shelf is a huge waste of money.  And from Microsoft’s perspective is something you’re not likely to buy again, so it is of course in their interest to offer such a program.

What kinds of services are included in DTDPS? Currently there are 3 DTDPS offerings available: TFS deployment planning, Visual SourceSafe migration planning, and Microsoft Test Professional deployment planning. You’ll notice a theme here, the word “planning”. These engagements are not meant to be used to implement the tools. Instead, they are short, fixed-length (3 and 5 days) engagements for gathering data and analyzing a customer’s current environment in order to help them build a plan for implementation and adoption of TFS and/or MTM.

But what if I don’t need one of those services, but need other assistance with TFS? Well, it depends. I know, I know, typical consulting answer. These programs can be expanded upon to assist customers with other ALM related concerns, so drop me a line and I’ll be happy to discuss it with you in more detail. Also, the programs being offered may be changing soon so check the site occasionally to see if a program was added to fit your needs.  

Who delivers the engagement? DTDPS is a program delivered through certified and experienced ALM partners like Polaris Solutions to help customers with SA (Software Assurance) benefits to take full advantage of the tools they own.  This means customers benefit from a wealth of relevant experience and established best practices that only comes from having deployed and leveraged the tools in a large number of environments.

OK, I’m intrigued, but how expensive is it? It is FREE. Seriously, and absolutely.  This benefit is available to customers who purchase Microsoft products with SA, think of it as a rewards program. In fact, you may have DTDPS credits without knowing it!  Many of the customers I work with did not know they had DTDPS credits available until I turned them onto the program.

I want in! How do I sign up?  Start at the DTDPS site. Here you can peruse the various services available and see which ones are right for you and your organization.  Then check out the DTDPS QuickStart guide which walks you through the steps of accessing your benefits.  Then you just pick a partner to work with, like us, and you’re on your way to a better way of doing ALM!

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Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group Meets July 31st

by Angela 15. July 2013 12:40

It’s that time again! We’re meeting on July 31st at the Aon Center in downtown Chicago to talk about one of my favorite features of the 2012 toolset, database management with TFS!  You can do some pretty slick stuff with the latest set of free data tools.  That’s right, they are FREE now.  Here are some more details on what’s being covered:

Abstract: One of the trickiest parts of ALM is tracking changes to database schemas related to building and deploying a particular release. The tooling from Microsoft once again changed in 2012 with the replacement of Visual Studio Database Projects (aka “Data Dude”) with SSDT. This hands-on presentation will discuss how to convert from previous versions of Visual Studio Database Projects as well as reverse engineering a schema from an existing database. The presentation will also look at changing and refactoring the database and how to incorporate the tool into the build and deploy cycles.

Speaker Bio: Daniel Sniderman is an Associate Principal Consultant for Magenic, one of the nation's premiere Microsoft Gold Certified Partners. Dan first learned to program FORTRAN in in the late 70’s using a keypunch machine and has thirty years of experience in software development. Since 1993, Dan has specialized on developing business applications on the Microsoft platform. Dan has worked at Magenic since 2004 specializing in customer software development and ALM consulting. In addition to a BA from the University of Illinois, Dan has a MCSD.NET and MCTS in Team Foundation Server 2010. Dan also is a professional trombonist performing regularly with the B.S. Brass Band and The Prohibition Orchestra of Chicago. Dan has two children: Joella age 7 and Elijah age 2.

Date:              Wednesday July 31st 2013

Location:         Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Agenda:          6:30PM Dinner followed by a presentation and demo at 7pm

Registration:      http://chicagoalmug.org/

As always, please be sure to register as Aon Center security will NOT allow individuals to access the building without being pre-registered.

Tags:

development | database management | Visual Studio 2012 | Visual Studio | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2012 | SQL Server 2012 | SQL Server | SDLC | SDET

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Going to ThatConference? You SHOULD be!

by Angela 12. July 2013 12:36

This year is the second ThatConference and it is going to ROCK. Not only can you spend 3 days in the Wisconsin Dells hanging out with your peers learning about .NET, Java, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Ruby, PHP, agile, Azute, TypeScript, JavaScript, Node JS, Angular JS - has your head exploded yet? And that’s not all that’s being covered, I just got tired of typing in technologies. It’s quite mind-blowing. So pretty much anyone interested in tech will get a lot out of this conference.  Why pay thousands to go to a conference focusing on just one specific language, vendor, or platform? ThatConference is for the community, by the community. And we mean that.

Best part, it’s only $349 and that includes all sessions, keynotes, food, and a heck of a pig roast at the waterpark. You even get s discounted rate for the Kalahari both during the conference and the weekend before in case you want to make a vacation out of it.  I know I am!  Also, did I mention it is at an amazing water park?  With go-karts, laser tag, a climbing wall, a ferris wheel, need I say more? AND, as if that was not awesome enough, for a very small amount (just $39 total) you can even add your family to the fun.  We now have a kids’ track. The Family schedule can be found here: http://www.thatconference.com/Schedule/FamilySchedule 

Check out the session list here: http://www.thatconference.com/sessions. Note: MY session is Monday morning, so hope to see you there! Smile

Here are the specifics (you need to go to registration to see this, so maybe I can save you some clicks):

Attendee $349

The 2013 attendee ticket. Full access to over 125 sessions, keynotes, food and one epic water park. But be careful, water and electronics don’t play together. Ziploc bags not included.

Family Ticket $39

That Conference is a family friendly conference and this year we continue to improve on our family experience. This year we have a dedicated family schedule that includes 2 family sessions each day. Your family will have the opportunity to meet a few animals from the local zoo, to learning how to build some awesome robots with Lego. But that isn’t all! This year families will get their own badges, join us at our daily happy hour, beat another geek during game night and of course join us for a spectacular dinner at our signature pig roast and more. All that fun does come at a very small cost. For just 39.00 per family, you’re helping That Conference bring such epic fun to all.

GiveCamp & The Humanitarian Toolbox (Sat & Sun)  $0 – Heck yeah, it is FREE

On August 10th and 11th, That Conference will host the 2013 Midwest GiveCamp. This year, Midwest GiveCamp and That Conference will team up with the Humanitarian Toolbox in a quest to help build software in support of disaster relief. This is a free event and food will be provided.

Coderetreat ( Sun ) $0 – Heck yeah, it is FREE

On ** Sunday August 11th from 11AM - 7PM** That Conference will host a free Coderetreat. Coderetreat is a day-long, intensive practice event, focusing on the fundamentals of software development and design. By providing developers the opportunity to take part in focused practice, away from the pressures of 'getting things done', the coderetreat format has proven itself to be a highly effective means of skill improvement. Practicing the basic principles of modular and object-oriented design, developers can improve their ability to write code that minimizes the cost of change over time. More information found here: http://coderetreat.org/

Tags:

.NET 4.5 | ALM | ASP.NET | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | Azure | Cloud Computing | HTML5 | MSDN | Mobile development | SDLC | TFS 2012 | Team Foundation Server | U/X | User Experience | Visual Studio | Windows 8 | iOS | JavaScript

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And Now For Something Completely Different

by Angela 12. July 2013 09:15

So, I feel like most (if not all) of my posts have largely revolved around ALM events and specific features of the Visual Studio product line. After quite a few conversations with customers frustrated with the non-bits and bytes aspects of ALM, I wanted to write down some thoughts on some things I am seeing out in “the real world”. You see, we always talk about how ALM is about people, process, and tools. And 9 times out of 10 (maybe more like 49 out of 50 in reality) any ALM talk I go to focuses only on process and/or tooling. Why? Because solving the people problem is HARD. Nay, that implies people are a problem, and that it is one that can be solved. In a lot of cases, the best you can hope to do is recognize the challenges, address the low hanging fruit in the short term, and in the long term support people’s evolution to a more agile way of thinking in any way that you can. But like me, you may have Microsoft certifications, or even Scrum.org certifications, but you certainly don’t have a degree in psychology.

You can educate people on the principals of agile but you can’t MAKE people truly embrace them, and it can be incredibly frustrating if you’ve seen the mountains of evidence, and maybe even have personal success stories of your own proving it is the right direction for a team. Kind of like me knowing that if I went to the gym regularly and started paying attention to what I ate, I would be a much healthier and physically fit person, but I can’t seem to convince myself to make the 1.5 block walk to the local gym to do it. Sad, I know. But I’m working on it, kinda. The roadblock I see even more often is that while the team wants to give it a go, management’s attitude is that “agile couldn’t possibly work for MY organization”. It is always followed by reasons like “’we’re too big”, “we’re too small”, “we’re too heavily regulated”, or my favorite “I couldn’t possibly TRUST my developers enough to give them that kind of freedom”. This is where I try not to look completely horrified in front of the person who just said that. I’m a professional after all J

I joke about wanting to go back to school for a degree in psychology sometimes when I find myself in these situations. Honestly, I’m only kind of joking. Being an ALM practitioner is not just about knowing how to configure a build server, or create a new work item type, or even migrate a massive organization to the awesomeness that is the Visual Studio ALM toolset (or any other ALM tool for that matter, I happen to be Microsoft focused). Those things help, a lot. But it’s also about leading organizations through cultural transformations, whether those be massive agile transformations, or simply getting teams to have a more healthy, open, and collaborative relationship on the simplest of terms. They will need mentoring, maybe even hand-holding to get through some of the roadblocks of a massive change. This is true in ANY walk of life, but for now I am focusing on the software development world.

I apologize that this is a bit of a teaser, but people tend to get bored pretty quickly so I’ll leave you here and promise to dive into something even deeper in my next post. And as always, I’d love to hear about your own experiences, or be linked to some particularly helpful advice you’ve come across. I am a passionate evangelist and agilista, but I’m by no means an expert, yet. That will take many, many more years, and even more grey hair (that you will never see!).

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | Agile | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio | Process Methodology

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Join the Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group on Wednesday, May 15 to talk ALM and DevOps

by Angela 6. May 2013 16:39

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Did you know that there was integration between System Center 2012 Operations Manager and Team Foundation Server 2012? This integration is designed to facilitate communication between operations teams and development teams, which is part of an industry movement known as DevOps. The goal is to accelerate Mean Time To Resolution (MTTR) by quickly providing development teams with as much relevant and useful information as possible about a production incident. Since System Center 2012 Operations Manager already has a deep understanding about your production systems and the applications which are running in those environments, this integration puts that information at the fingertips of the development team without requiring back-and-forth human interaction to solicit these details.  Brian will spend some time talking through how this works, the benefits of DevOps and some real world examples of this awesome partnership at work. Now there is even a great image available so you can kick the tires with minimal setup, thanks to Brian Keller: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudioalm/archive/2013/02/07/devops-virtual-machine-with-team-foundation-server-2012-and-system-center-2012-now-available.aspx. Please note the higher base system requirements to run this image, it's a bigun'.

 

Brian A. Randell is a partner with MCW Technologies, LLC. Brian spends his time between teaching Microsoft technologies to developers, working with new and emerging technologies like Visual Studio 2010 & Team Foundation Server, and consulting worldwide for clients that that range from large Fortune 100 business to state governments to small businesses. In 2010 and 2012, Brian and his team built samples and demonstration content for Microsoft to be used for their worldwide launch activities for Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server. Brian enjoys helping people get the most out of their software. He does this through training and speaking at events such as VSLive!, Tech•Ed, and Microsoft’s PDC. In addition, Brian shares through the written word. He is a co-author of Effective Visual Basic, has written articles for MSDN magazine, MSDN Online and other publications. Brian is a member of Pluralsight’s technical staff. In addition, Brian is currently an Microsoft ALM MVP. You can reach Brian via his blog at http://www.mcwtech.com//blogs/brianr/ or on twitter as @brianrandell.

Date:               Wednesday May 15th 2013

Location:         Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Agenda:          6:30PM Dinner followed by a presentation and demo at 7pm

Registration:      http://chicagoalmug.org/

As always, please be sure to register as Aon Center security will NOT allow individuals to access the building without being pre-registered.

Tags:

MSDN | Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | Visual Studio 2012 | Visual Studio | development | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | SDLC | SCOM | DevOps | System Center

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Are you managing your database along with your source code? Why not?

by Angela 23. April 2013 17:17

This is both a call to arms and a last notification of the awesome topic being covered at the Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group tomorrow night.

In my day to day dealings with companies I often find that they are not managing their database in any way  ::commence slow head shake:: And in my head I am screaming while I politely smile and calmly ask how they keep track of database changes, how they test updates to the schema, and what their rollback process is. Some companies do actually have some solid processes around those types of things, but many have nothing but a rosary and a case of Redbull. They just backup their servers nightly, and rolling back changes is a nuclear option. There is a better way people!

Ideally, you have you database schema, and any executable database code checked into SOME source control management system. By which I mean you have the SCRIPTS necessary to create those things in source code (see screenshot below). Without a good tool, establishing that can be tedious, daunting, and usually isn’t done, period. One of the things I love about Visual Studio  is its slick handling of database asset management (which has been around since VS 2008). In no time at all you can reverse engineer a database schema and all dependent objects into a database project in Visual Studio and check it in. Yes, just like that. That’s of course just the beginning but I’ll keep this soapbox rant short and expand in future musings.

The tools get better and better with each new version and the SDET tools that plug-in to VS 2012 are the best yet. Here is a quick preview of what that experience looks like in Visual Studio 2012.  I am running Ultimate but you would have the same look and feel in just plain old Professional as well.

image

 

Now if you are still a hard core SSMS user, fear not. You can still get some of the awesomeness of TFS working for you in SSMS, but finding out where to set that up can be tricky. Quick tip, if you already have TFS installed at your company, really you just need the TFS connector and to flip the switch

image

And now for the info on the user group, there’s still a little time left to sign up. Do it, DO IT NOW!!

Visual Studio and TFS 2012 for managing your SQL Server Database Assets

Do you have SQL Server database assets you should be managing? If you have a SQL Server database you certainly do! Do you use TFS to manage your other software assets like architectural diagrams, source code and build scripts? Are you using that same great toolset to manage your SQL scripts?  If not, you SHOULD be.

Did you that know some of the same great ALM features that you love about TFS for your source code can be applied to SQL 2005/2008/2012 stored procedures, table definitions, functions and other schema objects? And that's not all, there are also tools for doing schema comparisons, static analysis, unit testing and deployment of your database assets.  Jim will be giving an overview of the database tools available with VS and TFS 2012.

This is a meeting NOT to be missed.

Join Us Wednesday, April 24, 2013 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Location:Microsoft-Downers Grove 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove

Speaker Bio: Jim Szubryt is the TFS Product Manager for the Enterprise Workforce at Accenture in Chicago and is a Microsoft ALM MVP. His TFS Team supports 2,500 developers in the global development centers and works with teams on implementing ALM processes. His blog can be found here.

Agenda:6:30PM Dinner followed by a presentation and demo at 7pm

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Free Tech Event Coming to Chicago April 30th–Code Mastery

by Angela 19. April 2013 13:19

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Magenic is hosting a FREE Code Mastery event at the Chicago Microsoft Office on Tuesday April 30th from 8:30AM – 4PM

Code Mastery delivers high-quality technical content, designed to present you with meaningful and insightful learning experiences. Come spend a day with Magenic's best and brightest - you'll be glad you did. Our featured speaker is Rockford Lhotka, Magenic's CTO, Microsoft MVP, and creator of the popular CSLA.NET framework.

The event is free and food will be provided. Learn More OR Register Now!

Featured Topics:

· Introduction to Web API

· Understanding Azure Mobile Web Services

· Mobile Enterprise Deployment

· ASP.NET with MVC

· HTML5/CSS3/JS

· Effective Design for Mobile Apps

· Integrating iOS with Azure Mobile Services

· Getting Started Building Amazing Windows Phone 8 Apps

Tags:

.NET 4.5 | MVC | iOS | Azure | Mobile development | HTML5 | Windows 8

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ThatConference – Mark Your Calendars and Call for Speakers is OPEN

by Angela 1. April 2013 16:43

So as a Midwesterner I often feel like we get screwed when it comes to big, cool tech conferences.  ALM Summit is always in Redmond, TechEd is always in Vegas or L.A. (blech), and there are a large number of other big tech conferences that are primarily only held on the West Coast (Mix, VS Live, etc.). So this big news so far this year has been that VS Live is coming to Chicago in May, for one. I’m pretty excited about that, especially with the sweet discount I was able to get for it (see the blog post I linked to above for a $500 discount code to VS Live Chicago). 

Now don’t get me wrong, we have a lot of great, smaller conferences, for instance Chicago Code Camp in a few weeks, and Deeper in .NET in Milwaukee next weekend, are both very good conferences and are both FREE to boot. But another awesome conference you may have missed out on last year was ThatConference. What conference? ThatConference. Yeah, I know, the name is clever, and sometimes confusing, but mostly clever.  It is the next big thing in my opinion, because not only is it owned by, organized by, and delivered by people you know from your local community, but the range of topics is pretty amazing too.  .NET, Ruby, Java, iPhone, Android, Windows Phone, Tablet, Surface, iPad, you name a technology/platform and it is probably going to be represented there.

As an added bonus, it is a VERY family friendly conference being held at an awesome water park in the Wisconsin Dells, just 3.5 hours from Chicago if you live in my neck of the woods.  Kalahari Resort also has go-karts, laser tag, a large arcade, an indoor ferris wheel, a number of great restaurants and bars, and even a salon and spa if you need a little R&R with your tech!  Stay a few extra days, the room rates are amazing and last year we also got some pretty nice perks (a.k.a. free stuff) from the resort because we were attending the conference.

Call for speakers just opened today and is only open for 2 weeks so hurry up and get your submissions in! Don’t worry if you think your topic is too broad, too niche, too whatever, just get it in there.  There is a great submission guide available on the session submission site too so check it out! The range of topics being accepted is pretty large, as we hope to provide a really well rounded set of options for attendees.  If you have more questions, or would like some help creating your session write-up, join us every Wednesday at noon CST for Q&A on G+.

 

Hope to see you, and your sessions, at ThatConference this summer!

August 12th - 14th, 2013

Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, WI

 

ThatConference is also on facebook, or Google Groups if you have questions or comments for the world at large.

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Chicago Code Camp 2013–It’s Awesome and it’s FREE

by Angela 22. March 2013 12:54
What is Chicago Code Camp? Well, it’s in its fifth year of awesomeness and if you haven’t checked it out, go do it now.  CCC is a free, community-driven developer conference. Over 350 people have already registered so far! This year, they’ve even adding a full day of Windows Azure boot camp.

 

So if you’ve been to CCC before, go ahead and stop reading because you’ve already registered and know what an amazing free event this is, right?  If you’ve never been, well, it is worth the trip up North (or South if you are in Wisconsin)!  Chicago Code Camp is free, and covers a WIDE variety of great tech topics.  As someone clearly passionate about ALM, I was particularly happy to see the number of ALM related topics at CCC this year, and as usual the speakers are really great too. 

So mark your calendars (April 27th to be specific) and register right now!

 

Here is just a sampling of the ALM sessions:

- Introduction to Git and Github - [Joshua Gall, Aurora Healthcare]

- This *IS* Agile Development - [Gary Pedretti, Centare]

- Version control TFS 2012 - [Prasanna Ramkumar, Magenic]

- ALM with Visual Studio 2012 - [Raj Krishnan, Microsoft]

- TFS 2012 - [James Szubryt, Accenture]

 

More great sessions and speakers are outlined here: http://www.chicagocodecamp.com/Public/Schedule.  Stoked yet? You should be.  Did I mention this is also FREE?

 

Click here to register for Chicago Code Camp 2013

 

19351 W Washington Street Grayslake, IL 60030

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Tags:

.NET 4.5 | ALM | ASP.NET | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | Azure | Cloud Computing | HTML5 | MSDN | SDLC | TFS 2012 | Powershell | Productivity | TFS | Team Foundation Server | Testing | Visual Studio 2012 | Visual Studio | Windows 8 | development | git

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